Installing a green roof is an environmentally-friendly alternative to traditional asphalt or tile roofs. In addition, homeowners can use their green roof to express themselves with their roof garden design.

A green roof is an integrated system of several layers including sub-roof, waterproofing, a root barrier, a drainage system and soil for growing the plants. The layers should be properly built and constructed for a long-lasting and visually appealing roof.
What is a green roof?

A green roof is an integrated system of several layers including sub-roof, waterproofing, a root barrier, a drainage system and soil for growing the plants. The layers should be properly built and constructed for a long-lasting and visually appealing roof.
Types of green roofs

Intensive: These roofs are generally large and accessible with walkways. Sometimes referred to as a roof garden, you can find them on top of office or apartment buildings. They include large plants, trees and sometimes water features.

Extensive: This thinner, lighter version of a green roof is more like a traditional roof. Usually, low-ground cover plants replace shingles and the roof is more functional than artistic. Extensive roof gardens are grown on sloped or flat roofs.

Semi-intensive: Semi-intensive green roofs combine elements of both intensive and extensive. These roofs strike a balance between the artistic intensive roof and the functional extensive roof. Grasses and flowers are common choices and semi-intensive roofs use design for impact.
The environmental benefits of a green roof

Green roofs have been around for centuries, but today’s green roofs are gaining popularity for their environmentally friendly qualities. Some of these benefits include:

Storm water retention: According to Zinco, 50 to 90 per cent of rainwater is retained in a green roof. Green roofs reduce and delay storm water runoff, so there’s less water wasted down storm drains and less potential for harmful substances to enter the rivers and oceans.

Noise reduction: A green roof muffles some of the ambient sound, which is especially important in cities or urban areas.

Reduction in building energy costs: Asphalt roofs can become extremely hot in the sun, causing air conditioners to work harder and use more energy. A green roof reduces roof temperature and also provides better insulation from the cold.

Reduction in roof replacements: Replacing a roof, especially if the waterproofing layer is damaged, is costly and produces lots of waste. A green roof has a long lifespan. In fact, the Rockefeller Center in New York City has a green roof waterproofing membrane that has not been replaced since the 1930s.

Reduction in greenhouse gases: Living plants produce oxygen. It goes without saying that the more green roofs on our planet, the better off we will be.

Green roofs help the environment in many ways. From a small shed or garage to the roof of a city building, installing a green roof creates a healthier environment and creates something beautiful to look at.

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