If you’re investing in property, you will need to carefully consider what type of flooring you want to install in which rooms.

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Naturally, different types of flooring best suit different rooms, depending on their use, the amount of ‘traffic’ they are likely to get from users and other factors, including your budget, how durable you need the flooring to be and what type of property it is.

Here we look at a few factors which may influence your choices, and see which flooring is best in different circumstances.

What Kind of Property Is It?

It seems obvious, but if you’re fitting out a home for sale it will require better-quality flooring than a lower-end rental property. You won’t want to kit out a house with cheap vinyl if you’re planning on putting it on the market for half a million pounds, as expectations will be high.

Similarly, if you’re opening a hotel, your choice of flooring will largely depend on its expected clientele and expected star rating.

Which Rooms Is It For?

As with your own home, you largely choose the flooring material dependent on which room it is in. For example, you should never put a carpet in a kitchen, which needs a floor which is both hard-wearing and able to stand spills.

If you’re putting flooring in an office space or a hotel foyer, it needs to be durable to withstand all that heavy footfall – basic but strong carpet is best here, as it is comforting underfoot but still hard-wearing enough to last a long time before wear starts to show.

According to GoHaus, cleaning, safety and noise are other factors to consider.

Rental properties are probably best served by wooden or laminate flooring, as these will last longer and are less likely to be ruined by spills and stains.

Solid wood flooring, such as that from http://www.ukflooringdirect.co.uk/solid-wood-flooring, is a good bet for all types of investment property, as it not only looks fabulous but will withstand all manner of abuse.

If you have a flat on the upper floor of a house, it is probably best to consider carpet instead of solid wood flooring, as it reduces noise and therefore ensures fewer complaints from neighbours.

Carpet is also a good insulator, so it may help reduce your energy bills.